Author Topic: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime  (Read 132065 times)

Offline Amechra

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #780: July 24, 2016, 01:02:00 AM »
Make a Dragon version of Astral Construct, then make a base class that's focused around it, with all the different True Dragon types being the equivalent of Ectopic Form feats.

Not sure if breath weapon and frightful presence should be default features of the "construct"...

I think one of Sirpercival's Ethos of the Wyrm classes did that.

I just checked, and the Scaleshaper does do that as an incidental thing. Gives me an idea, though.
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Offline Jackinthegreen

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #781: July 27, 2016, 02:54:51 PM »
Allow the normally Kalashtar-only feats Path of Shadows and Dancing with Shadows to also work with Drow or other dexterous and/or shadowy races.  Also change Path of Shadows to work with SLAs and PLAs since those also use Concentration checks to cast defensively.
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Offline Bronzebeard

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #782: July 28, 2016, 05:24:37 PM »
If, instead of the current Initiative system, you do the following:

Rolling d20 for initiative.
The lowest number starts the combat, going from lowest number to highest.
Each player declare his action. No more then 1 standard, 1 move and 1 minor action.
Every action will take a certain 'cost' by number. e.g. 10 cost for standard sword swing. And will be added to initiative to a new number.
Every action is resolved when the projected new initiative is reached.

When all involved pass a certain milestone they can all be reduced for a lower number (like, all characters have initiative higher then 20, then deduct 20 from all initiative).

-------------------------------------

The reasoning for this is a better 'react' mechanics: no more a multitude of immediate/swift etc.
Instead, if a wizard casts a spell and it will take him 15 points then I could throw an axe and it will take me only 5 points and it will be resolved before the spellcasting ends.

-------------------------------------

Offline Garryl

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #783: August 29, 2016, 04:48:25 PM »
Some ideas for another system.

- Philosophy of die rolls. You should only be rolling a die when you are actively doing something (and then only if it's something with a random component to its success or degree of success). Defenses should always be "passive", with only the attacker making any rolls, unless you're doing something special to actively defend, such as a special parry or performing a counterspell or something like that beyond the basic and assumed dodging and blocking in combat.

Armor
- PDD: Protect, Dodge, Deflect. These are the three main things that define armor.
- Protect reduces the damage you take from most hits.
- Dodge influences your ability to just get out of the way of attacks, preventing them from dealing any damage at all. Heavier armor has lower dodge, and may even have penalties to it.
- Deflect influences your ability to redirect the force of attacks against you, halving the damage they deal to you before applying damage reduction from the armor's protect value. Heavier armor has higher deflect.
- Shields generally add to protect and deflect.
(click to show/hide)

Weapons
- Weapons deal damage. Smaller weapons deal less damage, while larger, heavier weapons deal higher damage.
- Weapons provide an accuracy bonus. When attacking with a weapon, you add its accuracy bonus to your attack roll. Smaller weapons are more accurate, while larger, heavier weapons are less accurate.
- Most weapons have additional effects that influence how they work in combat. For example, bludgeoning weapons usually ignore half of the target's damage reduction (such as from their armor's protect value), and heavy weapons usually gain an additional bonus when determining whether they're deflected into a glancing hit or not.

Attacks
- When you attack, you roll to hit. Add all of your bonuses together with the result of a d20. Compare that result to your target's defense score (which includes dexterity, dodge from armor, cover bonuses, and other factors that prevent them from being hit entirely). You hit if you equal or exceed that number.
- If you hit, also compare your attack roll to your target's deflection score (their defense score plus their armor's deflect modifier and any other factors that reduce the severity of a hit but don't negate it completely). If your roll is less than that number, it's just a glancing hit.

Offline linklord231

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #784: September 29, 2016, 01:11:10 AM »
Yet Another Druid Replacement:

d8 Hit Die, 3/4 BAB, 4 skill points per level
Sorcerer casting off the Druid list, probably Wisdom based. 
Use the PHB2 Shapeshifter variant, without the stupid "No Natural Spell" limitation.
No Animal Companion (Rangers get full animal companion).
Alternate class feature:  Trade Shapeshifting for Animal Companion.
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Offline Garryl

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #785: November 16, 2016, 01:00:19 AM »
Actually, if you do something like that except actually enforced in the rules, then aside from the auxiliaries, you don't actually need to have techniques completely replace the tags by default, instead only overwriting whichever tag category they grant a tag to. Tags might only get cleared if you use a technique that specifically removes them (like a big finisher). Um, hmm... I'm getting conceptual ideas for a system like that that also leverages the multiple attacks per round that high BAB characters get into a sort of build-your-own-combo system (within the span of a full attack). That would require at least 4 independent tag categories, rather than 2. Don't need to worry about extra attacks, since the maximum potency (and required tags) is limited based on the strongest techniques you know, so you don't get anything super extra, just building up to another smaller combo, or to make a more powerful parry available with a full powered finisher.

Note: Names are highly subject to change.
Note: Rules text for states is kinda sketchy so far, mostly off-the-top-of-my-head stuff that hasn't been through a polish pass yet.
Note: For a given complexity tier, assaults typically require one fewer states than the tier (0-3), parries the same as the tier (1-4), and finishers one more than the tier (2-5). Exceptions exist, typically with assaults that use the same number of states as the tier (1-4).
Note: Assaults typically add one state. They may also change some of the states in categories they already require to use.
Note: Parries typically change states in categories they require to use, but rarely add or remove states.
Note: Haven't decided how you learn them. Most likely class-based, like almost everything (plus some feats for a bit of outside access).

Can be in no more than one state at a time for each category. If you would be put into another state, you lose the prior state of that category. If you would be put into multiple states within the same category at once, you choose which one you remain in. It is possible to not be in any state for a given category.
  • Position: High, Middle, Low
  • Motion: Bash, Thrust, Slash
  • Stance: Aggressive, Defensive, Mobile
  • Focus: Fixated, Flowing, Wild
  • Ki: Cool, Flaring, Hidden
  • Soul: X, Y, Z
You begin each encounter in no state for each category.

Complexity: Each technique has a complexity, which indicates how hard it is to learn and use, and how powerful it is. Higher complexity techniques require more states to use.
  • Basic: The simplest techniques. Basic techniques typically only make use of position, motion, and stance. Available at level 1.
  • Advanced: Advanced techniques for a trained combatant. Advanced techniques begin to incorporate focus. Available at level 6.
  • Expert: Complex techniques usable only by experts. Expert techniques more directly use and manipulate ki. Available at level 11.
  • Secret: The most complicated and potent techniques. Some secret techniques even go so far as to draw on the power of the user's very soul. Available at level 16.
Techniques: Techniques are the abilities of this subsystem. Techniques can be used at will as long as you meet their state requirements.

A technique's save DC is 10 + 1/2 your Base Attack Bonus + an ability modifier. For assaults and finishers, you use the modifier that you add to your attack roll with the weapon you are using (usually Strength for melee attacks, or Dexterity for ranged attacks). For other techniques (forms and parries), you use your Dexterity modifier.

Forms
(click to show/hide)

Assaults
(click to show/hide)

Finishers
(click to show/hide)

Parries
(click to show/hide)

« Last Edit: November 16, 2016, 03:28:34 PM by Garryl »

Offline Nanshork

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« Last Edit: November 16, 2016, 11:04:26 AM by Nanshork »
Nanshork's "Notes to Self" (Extended Signature Thread)

Offline Amechra

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #787: November 18, 2016, 10:46:21 PM »
Something something Truenamer fix based off BCKW Combinator Logic.

Maybe:

- You have X syllables you can use. They do a single thing.
- By default, you speak a syllable and then a truename. It does (thing) to the target designated by the truename.
- You can chain syllables - if the next syllable isn't a truename, it modifies it a-la metamagic.
- Truename words are mostly set in stone - if you know [Fire][Water], you use it as [Fire][Water][truename], and that's it.
- Truenames are valid syllables.
- There are, however, four special syllables:
- - *B*: Takes the next three syllables, applies the second one to the third, and then applies the first one to that.
- - *C*: Takes the next three syllables and swaps the last two.
- - *W*: Takes the next two syllables and doubles the second one.
- - *K*: Takes the next two syllables and drops the second one.

Maybe an example will help (let's use the [Fire][Water] word):

1) Using [Fire][Water][Steve] will do [Fire+Water] to Steve. He gets hit by a dart of a boiling water or something.
2) [*B*][Fire][Water][Steve] will do [Fire] to [Water+Steve]. Maybe he gets a bonus to Dexterity before getting smacked with fire damage?
3) [*C*][Fire][Water][Steve] will do [Fire+Steve] to [Water]. Steve gets hit by fire, and then gets knocked prone?
4) [*W*][Fire][Water][Steve] will do [Fire+Water+Water] to Steve. Probably like #1.
5) [*K*][Fire][Water][Steve] will do [Fire] to Steve. Just straight fire damage.

=---=

The real question is how to get something playable out of this idea... You know, that won't require too much of an information overload.
"There is happiness for those who accept their fate, there is glory for those that defy it."

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Offline Amechra

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #788: November 22, 2016, 09:44:45 PM »
OK, a more standard one:

I've posted in the past about my idea of a world where "standard spell access" is limited to 1st level spells and lower. I've recently been reading Burning Wheel, and one of the things I rather liked about it is that it has penalties for learning spells "wrong".

Basically, it goes:

1) Spend a few months (Burning Wheel is a game that assumes a good deal of downtime) studying a spell - at the end you roll. You still get to learn the spell if you fail the roll within a few points - it just makes the spell harder to cast.

2) You practice casting it for a while.

3) You go back to the drawing board and fix your understanding of the spell. This gives you another roll - it removes the "harder to cast", but makes the spell take longer to cast if you fail by a little.

=---=

Basic houserule:

1) Swap prepared and spontaneous spellcasting in terms of metamagic increasing casting time.

2) All Wizards get the benefits of Elder Giant Magic - whenever they cast spells that they don't have Spell Mastery for, they have to use it for at least one round if they are able to.

3) Whenever a Wizard prepares a spell from a scroll or an other Wizard's spellbook, they can't apply metamagic to it, and increase the casting time as if they had done so. Also, scribing a spell from a book without the owner's help increases the spell's level by one, which can be bought off with something like the Dweomercrafter's dweomercrafts.

4) Wizards can get around the metamagic casting time increase by scribing the metamagic'd spell into their spellbook. Treat this like learning an entirely new spell of that level - metamagic reducers do count, but only if they're passive.

5) Oh, yeah - Scribe Scroll is banned unless you have it as a class feature.
"There is happiness for those who accept their fate, there is glory for those that defy it."

"Now that everyone's so happy, this is probably a good time to tell you I ate your parents."

Offline Garryl

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #789: January 03, 2017, 05:40:56 PM »
Demihumans as genetically modified humans for a sci-fi campaign setting.

If you were running a sci-fi game using the core of the D&D rules, and not doing it like Shadowrun where magic just mutates humans into the demihuman races, but you don't want elves and gnomes and such to be aliens or whatever, I was thinking that it might be neat for them to be different genetically engineered patterns of humans. I'm also including some mechanical changes (nothing major, and no nerfs) to fit with the fluff I'm giving them.

Humans
(click to show/hide)

Dwarves
(click to show/hide)

Elves
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Halflings
(click to show/hide)

Half-Orc
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Offline sirpercival

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #790: January 03, 2017, 07:34:57 PM »
Dragonborn are modded for hard vacuum. Large internal air bladders so that they can go a long time without breathing, a hard carapace to retain structural integrity, wings for solar sailing and maneuvering.
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Offline Garryl

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #791: January 07, 2017, 06:11:17 PM »
Differentiating The Effects Of Size From Racial Ability Score Modifiers
Smaller creatures have low Str and Con, but high Dex, while larger creatures have crappy Dex and sometimes absurd levels of Str and Con. Normal D&D rules scale up (or down) Str, Dex, and Con with size. Now, they also adjust a large number of other factors alongside these that the three ability scores also usually impact in and of themselves (attack rolls, AC, weapon damage, Hide checks, combat maneuvers, etc.), which kind of means you get two different effective modifiers to the same thing from the same source for the same conceptual reason, but that's a whole other can of beans beyond the scope of what I'm working on here, so I digress.

Now, here's an issue. How much of Str, Dex, and Con come from a larger or smaller creature being inherently better in that regard (like an Orc, Elf, or Dwarf), and how much come from the creature just having more mass to throw around because of its raw size? How much of a creature's strength should be from race and how much should be from size?

Since this question involves normalizing for size, it also serves as an effective start to standardizing the influence of size-changing effects. There are numerous ways to change in that, unlike Polymorphing, provide modifiers to the creature's ability scores instead of setting them to a fixed value. Unfortunately, the actual numerical effects of these different methods rarely agree with one another. The Enlarge and Reduce Person spells give one set of adjustments and Righteous Might gives another. Size change from monster HD advancement and template application is variable, the modifiers depending on the starting and ending sizes. The Wu Jen spell Giant Size changes to a specific size, and gives a fixed set of modifiers depending only on the ending size, not the starting size, even providing the massive Strength boosts associated with size growth despite the fact that large enough casters may even be shrunk by the spell.

Modifiers By Size
After looking through the various spells that modify size in Core, the monster growth table, and peeking at a small sample of monsters at various sizes, and adjusting to curb some of the worse excesses of Str growth with size, I've come up with a table of Str, Dex, and Con adjustments by size. This is my quick and dirty evaluation of the amount of a creature's racial ability modifiers I am approximating to come from raw size alone, using a Medium creature as the baseline. The rest of the racial ability score adjustments are exactly that, coming from the race's natural inclinations to be better or worse than the norm. Note that the numbers still definitely need tweaking.

Size CategoryStrDexConNatural Armor
Fine-4+8+0+0
Diminutive-4+6+0+0
Tiny-4+4+0+0
Small-2+2+0+0
Medium+0+0+0+0
Large+4-2+2+0
Huge+8-4+4+1
Gargantuan+12-4+6+3
Colossal+16-4+8+6

(click to show/hide)

For example, a Minotaur is a Large creature with +8 Str, +0 Dex, and +4 Con racial adjustments normally. In order to break that down into which part is racial and which part is raw size, we have to remove the size components. According to the table above, we can expect its size to be giving it +4 Str, -2 Dex, and +2 Con. Taking that away from the total modifiers it has means that the Minotaur's actual racial modifiers are +4 Str, +2 Dex, and +2 Con, the rest coming from its size.

Similarly, we can look at a Gnome. At size Small, it normally gets -2 Str and +2 Con. This breaks down into -2 Dex and +2 Con racial adjustments, plus the -2 Str and +2 Dex from its size.

Note that none of what's been described so far actually changes anything. The final ability scores a creature has are exactly the same whether it's a single racial modifier or broken down into a combination of racial and size modifiers.

Size-Changing Effects
The only real mechanical changes this is good for is for standardizing size-changing effects. Currently, they're all over the place. With this, we can rewrite them all to remove any specific values. Enlarge Person no longer gives a fixed +2 Str and -2 Dex. Instead, like all size-changing effects, it just changes your size. The size change itself changes your ability scores, since you'll be using the modifiers for your new size in place of your old. Ditto for Reduce Person, Righteous Might, and Giant Size.

You may notice that this results in a pretty serious buff to Enlarge Person. This is true with the numbers posted above. As I said, it's a quick and dirty approximation. It definitely needs tweaking and adjustment.

Advancing Monsters By Size
The table I posted above, you may notice, is roughly half what the Table: Changes to Statistics by Size in the Monster Manual gives. I kinda figured that roughly half of what monsters were getting from advancing size categories was just bulking up, and half was from advancing to be noticeably stronger and tougher independent of size. Of course, the table still gives some absurdly large changes to Str, so it's you're choice whether you want to replace those adjustments with the table above or just assume that the other half of things is actual additions to the racial ability bonuses.

« Last Edit: February 28, 2017, 12:33:30 PM by Garryl »

Offline Garryl

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #792: February 28, 2017, 01:08:35 PM »
When attempting to start a grapple against a larger opponent, normally you automatically lose an attempt to hold if the target is two or more size categories larger than you are. But I just watched some gameplay from Shadow of the Colossus, so that seems silly. So here's a new use for the Climb skill. I'm also tempted to write up some climbing rules to completely replace grappling against creatures 4+ size categories larger than you, but that's a bit more ambitious than I have the inspiration for at present.

Note that while this allows you to start a grapple without a successful grapple check, you don't get much benefit from it since your opponent isn't impeded, only you are. You still need to win a grapple check at some point to do much of anything in a grapple.

Climb (Str)

Grapple a larger opponent: When you attempt to grapple and hold a target that is two or more size categories larger than you, make a Climb check. You get a +4 bonus on this Climb check if you have four or more free hands, claws, or similar grasping limbs. You take a -4 penalty instead if you have less than two free hands.

The Climb DC is 15 + your target's Base Attack Bonus + your target's Strength modifier. If your target has significant amounts of hair, fur, loose clothing, or anything else on their body that can aid you in getting a solid grip, reduce the DC by 5. If your target is particularly slippery or otherwise difficult to hold on to, increase the DC by 5. If your target is amorphous, increase the DC by 10.

If you succeed on this Climb check, you do not automatically lose your attempt to hold. Additionally, even if you fail your Grapple check, you can still start a grapple and move into the target's space, although you do not deal your unarmed strike damage and only you, not your target, are considered grappling (similar to the Improved Grab ability).

« Last Edit: March 07, 2017, 05:25:53 PM by Garryl »

Offline Garryl

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #793: March 02, 2017, 12:37:07 AM »
Conjuring Feedback weapon special ability
Price: +1 bonus
Caster Level: 9th
Aura: Moderate abjuration
A successful attack with a conjuring feedback weapon against a summoned or called creature or object deals an additional +1d6 damage. Additionally, it deals 1d6 points of damage + the weapon's enhancement bonus to the summoner or caller of the creature or object.
Prerequisites: Craft Magic Arms and Armor, dismissal.

Conjuration Bane weapon special ability
Price: +1 bonus
Caster Level: 8th
Aura: Moderate abjuration
Conjuration bane functions as the bane special weapon ability. It activates against any summoned or called creature or object.
Prerequisites: Craft Magic Arms and Armor, dismissal.

Edit: Changed Banishment prereqs to Dismissal. I keep mixing up which one's which. For reference, Dismissal is the Clr 4, Sor/Wiz 5 spell, and Banishment is the Clr 6, Sor/Wiz 7 spell.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2017, 02:33:16 PM by Garryl »

Offline linklord231

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #794: March 02, 2017, 01:38:48 AM »
Conjuring Feedback weapon special ability
Price: +1 bonus
Caster Level: 9th
Aura: Moderate abjuration
A successful attack with a conjuring feedback weapon against a summoned or called creature or object deals an additional +1d6 damage. Additionally, it deals 1d6 points of damage + the weapon's enhancement bonus to the summoner or caller of the creature or object.
Prerequisites: Craft Magic Arms and Armor, banishment.

Conjuration Bane weapon special ability
Price: +1 bonus
Caster Level: 8th
Aura: Moderate abjuration
Conjuration bane functions as the bane special weapon ability. It activates against any summoned or called creature or object.
Prerequisites: Craft Magic Arms and Armor, banishment.

Building off that, how about a Conjuration Disrupting enchantment, based off the Disruption enchantment?

Conjuration Disrupting weapon special ability
Price: +2 bonus
Caster Level: 14th
Aura: Strong Abjuration
A summoned or called creature or object struck by a Conjuration Disrupting weapon must make a Will save (DC 14) or be forcibly sent back to it's home plane, as per the dismissal spell.
Prerequisites: Craft Magic Arms and Armor, dismissal
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Offline Garryl

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #795: March 03, 2017, 03:19:58 AM »
Wizard-like spellcasting for Arhosa seedcasters:
- Need spellbooks to contain spells known. A spell takes 1 page per seed effect involved. Variations on a spell can fit 2 per page, as they only describe the changes needed from the base spell they're built on. If acquired separately, requires writings for the base spell to make sense of them.
- Start with 3 + Int mod spells in your book. Learn another 2 spells each level.
- Can learn spells from magical writings with a Spellcraft check.
- Spells can have any combination of arcane seeds. Can only learn spells you can cast.
- Can create variations on spells you know. Variations cannot change the spell type, seed effects, or targeting options, but otherwise can be altered as you like. Can even increase or decrease the spell's SP cost, adjusting the power of individual seeds, etc.
- Can prepare spells with 1 hour's rest. If preparing spells worth less than your full normal spell pool in SP, takes proportionately less time, minimum 15 minutes. Can prepare multiple times in the same day, as long as you have enough unreserved SP to prepare with.
- Preparing a spell reserves SP equal to the spell's casting cost. Cannot spend reserved SP except on the spell it's reserved for.
- If your reserved SP would be greater than you available SP (for example, if your SP is drained), you have to choose prepared spells to give up until your reservation drops enough or you run out of prepared spells with any SP reservation.

Offline Garryl

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #796: March 08, 2017, 05:35:47 PM »
Tough Guy base class

d6 HD
1/2 BAB
All poor saves
2+Int skill points

Proficiencies: Simple and martial weapons, light, medium, and heavy armor, shields (except tower shields).

Tough Stuff: At each class level, you gain 1 additional Hit Die. These extra Hit Dice are Tough Guy Hit Dice (d6 hp, 2+Int skill points from the Tough Guy skill list, etc.), although they do not count as Tough Guy class levels. These Hit Dice count in most ways as normal Hit Dice, granting you additional feats, bonus hit points from a high Constitution, and so forth. The bonus Hit Dice do not, however, count when determining the following:
  • Your maximum skill ranks.
  • Whether or not you are an epic character.
  • Whether you qualify for a feat, prestige class, or other option based on your Character Level.
  • How much experience you gain or require for a new level.
  • Your Challenge Rating and Effective Character Level.
Thus, for example, a 3rd-level Tough Guy would still be a CR 3 opponent, would have a maximum of 6 ranks in a class skill, would gain experience as a 3rd-level character, and would be unable to qualify for the Leadership feat (requiring Character Level 6), despite having 6 Hit Dice.

If your hit points gained for a level of Tough Guy are maximized (such as for being first Hit Die) or otherwise influenced, so too are your hit points gained from the bonus Hit Die granted by that class level.

Fudging the Saving Throw Numbers: You gain a +2 bonus on all saves at levels 1, 2, and 4. This decreases to +1 at levels 3, 6, 7, 8, and 10. This bonus is removed entirely at level 9 and at levels 11 and onward.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2017, 05:50:17 PM by Garryl »

Offline linklord231

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #797: March 16, 2017, 08:51:55 PM »
The 2nd and 3rd levels of Human Paragon can also be used to advance Maneuvers, Binding, Meldshaping, Psionics, or whatever other subsystem you want besides regular Spellcasting. 
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Offline Garryl

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #798: March 17, 2017, 02:38:10 PM »
Crafting
Each item has five parameters that determine how hard it is to craft: cost, complexity, time, DC, and prerequisites.
  • Cost: How much it costs to craft the item.
  • Complexity: How many successful Craft checks are required.
  • Time: How long each Craft check takes.
  • DC: The DC and type of the Craft check.
  • Prerequisites: Any tools or abilities required to even attempt to craft the item.

To craft an item, you must make a number of successful Craft checks equal to the item's complexity. If you fail a Craft check, nothing bad happens, you just don't make any progress towards the item's completion with that check. However, once you fail a third Craft check, your attempt is a failure. All of your progress is lost (if you wish to try again, you must start over from 0 successes and failures) and 1/2 of the raw materials are ruined.

Accelerated Crafting
You can craft faster. For every -5 penalty you take on a Craft check, the time required for that check is halved. You can apply this repeatedly to a single check. For example, taking a -10 penalty would reduce the time required for the check to 1/4 normal. You can decide how fast to accelerate each check made to craft an item independently.

Tools
All crafts, except for the simplest of items, require artisan’s tools to give the best chance of success. If improvised tools are used, the check is made with a –2 circumstance penalty. On the other hand, masterwork artisan’s tools provide a +2 circumstance bonus on the check.

Crafting Mundane Items

Melee and Thrown Weapons
  • Cost: 1/3 the weapon's market value.
  • Complexity: 1 for simple weapons with a market value of less than 1 gp, 2 for other simple weapons, 3 for martial weapons, 4 for exotic weapons. Increase the complexity by 2 for masterwork weapons.
  • Time: 1 hour for simple weapons with a market value of less than 1 gp, 1 day for other non-masterwork simple weapons, 3 days for non-masterwork martial and exotic weapons, 1 week for masterwork weapons.
  • DC: 12 for simple weapons, 15 for martial weapons, 18 for exotic weapons. Increase the DC by 5 for masterwork weapons. You make Craft (weaponsmithing) checks.
  • Prerequisites: None for simple weapons with a market value of less than 1 gp. Artisan’s tools for other weapons.

Bows and Crossbows
  • Cost: 1/3 the weapon's market value.
  • Complexity: 2 for shortbows, 3 for longbows and crossbows, 4 for had crossbows. Increase the complexity by 1 + 1/2 the weapon's Strength rating for composite bows. Increase the complexity by 2 for masterwork weapons.
  • Time: 3 days for non-masterwork weapons, 1 week for masterwork weapons.
  • DC: 12 for shortbows, 15 for longbows and crossbows, 18 for hand crossbows. Increase the DC by 2 x the weapon's Strength rating for composite bows. Increase the DC by 5 for masterwork weapons. You make Craft (bowmaking) checks for bows and Craft (weaponsmithing) checks for crossbows.
  • Prerequisites: Artisan’s tools.

Ammunition (arrows and bolts)
  • Cost: 1/3 the ammunition's market value.
  • Complexity: 1. Increase the complexity by 2 for masterwork ammunition.
  • Time: 5 minutes for non-masterwork ammunition, 1 hour for masterwork ammunition.
  • DC: 12. Increase the DC by 5 for masterwork weapons. You make Craft (bowmaking) checks for arrows and Craft (weaponsmithing) checks for bolts.
  • Prerequisites: Artisan’s tools.

Armor and Shields
  • Cost: 1/3 the armor or shield's market value.
  • Complexity: 2 for light and heavy wooden shields and for padded and leather armor, 3 for other light and heavy shields, bucklers, and other light armor, 4 for medium armor, tower shields, and exotic shields, 5 for heavy armor, and 6 for full plate. Increase the complexity by 2 for masterwork armor and shields.
  • Time: 3 days for non-masterwork armor and shields, 1 week for masterwork armor and shields.
  • DC: 10 + the armor or shield's AC bonus. Increase the DC by 5 for masterwork armor or shields. You make Craft (armorsmithing) checks.
  • Prerequisites: Artisan’s tools.


Crafting Magic Items
Consider only the price and effects of a single magical property at a time.
  • Cost: 1/2 the item's market value in gp, 1/25 the item's market value in XP.
  • Complexity: 1 per 1000 gp of market value.
  • Time: 1 day.
  • DC: 10 + the item's caster level. You make caster level checks.
  • Prerequisites: You meet the prerequisites of the magical property to be added.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2017, 02:49:07 PM by Garryl »

Offline Garryl

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Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Reply #799: March 22, 2017, 05:56:44 PM »
Full Casting [General]
Prerequisites: Caster level 6th.
Benefits: As a full-round action, you can cast two spells. Each such spell must have a casting time of 1 standard action. You cast the first spell at your full normal caster level, but the second spell at 5 less than your normal caster level. Note that the reduced caster level may limit the highest spell level you can cast.

Improved Full Casting [General]
Prerequisites: Caster level 11th, Full Casting.
Benefits: When you use Full Casting, you can cast a third spell. You cast the third spell at a caster level 10 lower than your normal caster level.

Greater Full Casting [General]
Prerequisites: Caster level 16th, Full Casting, Improved Full Casting.
Benefits: When you use Full Casting, you can cast a fourth spell. You cast the fourth spell at a caster level 15 lower than your normal caster level.

Broken as fuck? Why yes, thank you for noticing.